Barents Sea Shelf - Structural Geology seminar

  • Date 04.04.2013
  • Time 12:00
  • Duration 1 day
  • Participants 47
  • Register by 01.04.2013
Barents Sea Shelf - Structural Geology seminar_main_img
Barents Sea Shelf - Structural Geology Seminar

The Structural Group invites to a half day seminar with topics on the Barents Sea Shelf on:

Thursday the 4th of April 2013

The seminar will be held at the Valhall theatre at NPD in Stavanger. The day will start at 12.00 with a sandwich lunch and there will be a coffee break in the afternoon. The day will focus on recent research within the Barents Sea region, in a chronological framework.

Preliminary program:

Alvar Braathen, University of Svalbard
Learnings on basement fracturing and weathering in rift-shoulder fault blocks; a reservoir analogue from the Sinai Suez Rift (Egypt).

Alvar Braathen, University of Svalbard, on behalf of Petromaks project team
Reconstructing the Triassic northern Barents Shelf; basin infill patterns controlled by gentle sags and faults

Alejandro Escalona, University of Stavanger, on behalf of the LoCRA consortium
Lower Cretaceous clastic wedges – an under-explored play in the Arctic

Willy Fjeldskaar, Tectonor, on Paleogene and Neogene uplift
The Neogene Uplift of the Barents Sea

On behalf of the organizing committee:

 

 

Topics

Alvar Braathen, University of Svalbard
Learnings on basement fracturing and weathering in rift-shoulder fault blocks; a reservoir analogue from the Sinai Suez Rift (Egypt).


This study describes deformation and weathering effects observed in basement rocks in the proximal footwall of rift-bounding faults and in the rift shoulder of the Suez Rift, revealed in world-class exposures in Sinai, Egypt. These outcrop-based datasets reflect those reported from hydrocarbon producing fields in the Suez Rift, and may represent valid analogues to hydrocarbon reservoirs encountered in granitoid rocks in the North Sea and elsewhere.

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Alvar Braathen, University of Svalbard, on behalf of Petromaks project team
Reconstructing the Triassic northern Barents Shelf; basin infill patterns controlled by gentle sags and faults

The Triassic succession of the Barents Sea offers a prolific petroleum system; verified for parts of the shelf but underexplored for vast areas. We explore the Triassic basin development and sedimentary infill of the northern Barents Shelf by integrating geological studies onshore Svalbard with offshore seismic data analysis. Ongoing research covers; (i) shallow-shelf infill by clinoform migration across regional sag-type basins, (ii) fluvial and shallow marine depositional systems of the migrating shelf, (iii) growth faulting in the distribution of reservoir sandstones, with implications for prospectivity, (iv) impacts on the sedimentary system of the interaction between shelf progradation, sag-basin development and faulting, and (v) tectonic reactivation of deep-seated zones of weakness and the link to far-field stress configurations in an analysis of large-scale driving forces.

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Alejandro Escalona, University of Stavanger, on behalf of the LoCRA consortium
Lower Cretaceous clastic wedges – an under-explored play in the Arctic

The Cretaceous time represents a key transition in the evolution of the Arctic region which resulted in the formation of most of the present-day Arctic basins. During this time, large areas of the Barents Sea uplifted, resulting in a change of the depositional patterns of the region. However, its development is poorly understood due to the lack of geological constraints. The presence of Lower Cretaceous clastic wedges have been recognized both in outcrop (e.g Svalbard, Greenland) and in the subsurface (e.g. Hammerfest basin, E. Barents Sea), but little attention have been paid to this interval, even though these wedges have been a target in the south-western Barents Sea where hydrocarbon technical discoveries have proven as a valid play model. In this presentation we provide an overview of the tectono-stratigraphic setting of the Lower Cretaceous with focus on the Barents Sea and its importance for future exploration campaigns.

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On the Neogene Uplift of the Barents Sea
Willy Fjeldskaar, Tectonor/University of Stavanger
 
Exploration for petroleum on the Norwegian Continental Shelf has demonstrated the crucial importance of Neogene uplift and erosion to exploration models. The problems of finding commercial hydrocarbon deposits in the Norwegian Barents Sea have been particularly attributed to glacial erosion and uplift. Some key implications of the Neogene erosin are: 1) source rocks will be at a higher degree of maturation than expected from their present depth and will cease to generate upon cooling; 2) regional tilting during glaciations and uplift results in changes to trap configuration and fluid migration deposits; 3) sealing horizons are removed and/or their effectiveness is severely reduced; 4) faults can be reactivated causing them to become conduits for hydrocarbon leakage to the surface; 5) potentially attractive reservoirs may be overcompacted and downgraded. This presentation will present reconstruction of the glacial erosion with an overview of important effects.

  

Photo: Øyvind Hagen - Statoil